Saturday, February 16, 2019
Home Blog Page 3

WHO KNOWS THE BIBLE TV GAME SHOW

0

Who knows the Bible is a Bible TV Show designed by MTvibes media to encourage the reading and studying of the bible. Young people across the country will be getting into Bible quizzing, gaining an intense desire for the word of God, and entering a deep relationship with its author.  Bible quizzing is a great way to encourage young people to study the Scriptures and win prizes here on earth before the eternal reward.  VISIT OUR BLOG.

Through quizzing they will experience a deep fellowship commitment with their own team, their competition, and, most importantly, with Jesus Christ.

By starting a quiz team or a quiz program we are taking on a noble and rewarding task. The goal of this section of the website is to provide you with necessary platform and information so that you can compete and win but most importantly to have a relationship with God through his word. We have divided the categories into the four listed below.  We have the ADULT, TEEN, GROUP AND FAMILY categories in WHO KNOWS THE BIBLE QUIZ COMPETITION.

WHO KNOWS THE BIBLE

Kickoff Tournament

Date

November 24th and 25th, 2018.

Location

WINNERS CHAPEL, AWKAETITI, ANAMBRA STATE.

Material and Rules

John 1-4

WKTB Rules

Cost and Registration

To be published later!

Registration is due by November 8

Sponsors should click here to learn how they can be part of this program

LET US MANAGE YOU

0

What is an artist manager?

A manager is someone who handles the day to day business dealings on behalf of an artist or band. The artist is in charge of creating the art and usually has an overall vision for the project, but it’s the managers’ job to take that vision, map out a viable plan, and execute it. A manager is also kind of the ring-leader of the business. Meaning agents, lawyers, publicists, business managers, promoters, labels, etc. don’t make substantial moves without conferring with the manager since their word is as good as the artist themselves. Artist management is one of the most personal jobs in the music business.

 

When is an artist ready for management?


Everyone is different, but here’s some things we look for:

From the moment you started the group or brand, you took it seriously (while having fun, of course) and put real thought into everything. The music is refreshing, well written, and produced with intention. People other than you should be talking about your music… like, a decent amount. There should be the beginnings of a brand that makes one feel something when they listen to your music, look at your photos, attend your shows, and check out your news. We need to see you in our newsfeed on Spotify, Facebook, Instagram,twitter etc. We want to go to local venues and see your poster on the wall. You can sell out a 400 persons venue in your local market and have a couple of small tours under your belt that you booked yourself. You feverishly e-mailed some decent blogs or hired a publicist to get some solid press from local and national music outlets. That is when you should book us and we will do the rest.

WHAT ARE YOU INTERESTED IN?

Please review our fee through our admin before paying and filling our forms. Thank you for choosing MTvibes media.

ACTING TUTORIALS….Towards a professional entertainer

0
Bethelez on screen
ACTING SCENE
CHARACTER

ACTING SCENE

Acting is the work of an actor or actress, which is a person in theatre, television, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play.
Most early sources in the West that examine the art of acting (Greek: ὑπόκρισις, hypokrisis) discuss it as part of rhetoric.
Definition and history

One of the first actors is believed to be an ancient Greek called Thespis of Icaria. An apocryphal story says that Thespis stepped out of the dithyrambic chorus and spoke to them as a separate character. Before Thespis, the chorus narrated (for example, “Dionysus did this, Dionysus said that”). When Thespis stepped out from the chorus (year 12 BC), he spoke as if he was the character (for example, “I am Dionysus. I did this”). From Thespis’ name derives the word thespian.

PICTURE GALLERY
Acting requires a wide range of skills, including vocal projection, clarity of speech, physical expressivity, emotional facility, a well-developed imagination, and the ability to interpret drama. Acting also often demands an ability to employ dialects, accents and body language, improvisation, observation and emulation, mime, and stage combat. Many actors train at length in special programs or colleges to develop these skills, and today the vast majority of professional actors have undergone extensive training. Even though one actor may have years of training, they always strive for more lessons; the cinematic and theatrical world is always changing and because of this, the actor must stay as up to date as possible. Actors and actresses will often have many instructors and teachers for a full range of training involving, but not limited to, singing, scene-work, monologue techniques, audition techniques, and partner work.
Professional actors

PICTURE SPLASH
Actor
A professional actor is someone who gets paid for acting. Not all people working as actors in film, television or theatre are professionally trained. For example, John Okafor did not have any training before taking up acting.

Training/Acting Systems

Drama school


Conservatories typically offer two- to four-year training on all aspects of acting. Universities will offer three- to four-year programs, where a student is often able to choose to focus on drama, while still learning about other aspects of theatre. Schools will vary in their approach, but in North America the most popular method taught derives from the “system” of Constantin Stanislavski, which was developed and popularised in America by Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler, and others. The ambiguously termed method acting came about through iterations of Stanislavski’s system by Strasberg. Part of this style of training includes actors memorizing lines to be able to work off-book, a term that means being able to work without a script. Other approaches may include a more physical approach, following the teachings of Jerzy Grotowski and others, or may be based on the training developed by other theatre practitioners including Sanford Meisner. Other classes may include mask work, improvisation, and acting for the camera. Regardless of a school’s approach, students should expect intensive training in textual interpretation, voice and movement. Although there are some teachers who will encourage the improvisation as technique in order to free the actor of limitations in rehearsal. Harold Guskin’s approach or “taking it off the page” as he calls it is steeped in this philosophy. Applications to drama programs and conservatories are through auditions in the United States. Anybody over the age of 18 can usually apply to drama school.
Training may also start at a very young age. Acting classes and professional schools targeted at the under-18 crowd are offered in many locations. These classes introduce young actors to different aspects of acting and theatre, including scene study.
Amateur actors

Reading rehearsal

Amateur actor

Amateur actors are actors who do not require payment for performances. Although there are some paid professional actors who do amateur work for multiple reasons. Some may be for educational purposes or even charity events.
Improvisation

Improvisation was created by Viola Spolin after working with Neva Boyd at a Hull House in Chicago, Illinois. She was Boyds student from 1924 to 1927. Improv was created on the realization that adults do not play games. Spolin felt that playing games were good exercises and can benefit in future acting. With improv, people can find true expressive freedom since they don’t ever know how the situation is going to turn out. When one continues to operate with an open mind they will have a real sense of spontaneity rather than pre-planning a response. You perform a character of your own making, and with that character and the others working with you, you create a new and spontaneous piece. Improv is also used to cover up if an actor or actress makes a mistake.

Simiotics of acting

Semiotics of Acting is the actor’s ability to transform into a convincing character in front of the audience. The audience no longer sees the actor as a performer, but sees a character as a completely different being. Once this shift occurs, the actor becomes a semiotic device communicating a set of signs to the audience. A character’s signification can represent a multitude of different meanings to the audience. This may or may not be intended by the actor, who has limited control over how the audience will “read” the character. For example, if the actor is playing a character diagnosed with cancer, the audience may not just see a cancer patient, but may instead see a character similar to other cancer victims or survivors they have known. The actor’s performance, like any text, must be read by the audience.
However, the actor is judged by giving a convincing and believable performance. The actor’s performance is mediated by particular semiotic signs including facial expression, emotion, and vocabulary. All these examples are known as performance signs. Performance signs are simple codes that the audience must decode during the actor’s performance. It is the actor’s job to deliver those codes effectively to the audience. If the audience does not find the character believable, then the actor has failed in their performance. Like other forms of communication, non-verbal or visual clues are tremendously important. Acting teacher Sanford Meisner once said, “An ounce of emotion is worth a pound of words.” Great actors master performance signs in order to win over an audience.


Acting involves two forms of communication: intrascenic (communication between characters) and extrascenic (communication between the characters and the audience). Both intrascenic and extrascenic communication must work in order for the audience to read the semiotic signs of the actor’s performance. The characters must have intrascenic skills – “good chemistry” – in a scene in order for the audience to understand the performance.
The actor represents the text of the script as performance signs. Actors bring the text to life through performance and through the personal qualities they may contribute to the narrative of script. Actors represent the ideas of the text, but also create a new visually dimensioned reality through their performance.
Becoming an actor representing semiotic signs can be a very difficult process. One must understand the performance signs, the audience, and human emotion.

BRANDING

0

How to Build Your Brand

1: Define yourself.

No matter your genre, you yourself are your brand when it comes to the arts. Product companies like Nike or Apple have the advantage of not being people. While they certainly want consumers to choose their products, Apple Inc doesn’t get its feelings hurt if someone prefers a PC to a Mac. On the other hand, putting yourself out there as an artist is extremely personal – and scary.

    What’s your brand identity?

So it’s important not only to identify your brand but also to believe in it.

Think about questions like:

What are my values? What do I really care about?

What’s important to me aside from my art?

What’s my look? Is there a certain group of people I like to identify myself with stylistically?

Don’t get too existential about it, but do take some time to sort it out in your own head.

  1. Be you – but simplified.

People are complicated. You are complicated. Your answers to the previous questions prove that. But your brand can’t be. If you’re trying to be all things to all people, you’ll never make anyone happy.

You are complicated . . . But your brand can’t be. You need to develop what’s called your “elevator pitch.” Imagine you get into an elevator with the biggest agent in your industry (hey, it could happen). She presses the button for floor 15 – you’ve now got 15 floors to explain in small words what you – your brand – is. And this chick has heard every pitch in the book, so you better make it good.

The key to a great pitch is putting the unique quality of your work into a context that others will understand; keeping it simple.

“Local artist conquering the East. Lone ranger with a swag.”

“Tricky finger painting the block buster sampling the ‘60s. A fairy colony on media lens.”

“Four-piece Nigerian band with a splash of Elton John.”

“Gruesome, sweaty, visceral photography. Macbeth with a camera.”

  1. Figure out who you’re talking to.

Now that you’ve got yourself figured out, it’s time to define your audience. And be honest – you know it’s not “all people everywhere all the time.” Who’s going to respond most enthusiastically to your work? When you’re first starting out, you’re going to want “super-fans”: people who will stick by your side, follow your every movement, and generally be as stalkers as possible without alerting the police. These are the people who will come to your shows, buy all your merch, and – most importantly – recommend you to their friends.

 

So is it:

Apathetic grunge pre-teen boys? Or trendy urban young females?

Hippie nature enthusiasts? Or corporate suit types?

The young Twitterati? Or the Palm Springs elderly?

The more specific the better in regards to gender, age group, subculture etc.

  1. Make all the things! (Staying on brand)

Okay. From this point on, everything you do, say, make, think – if it has anything at all to do with your work and your brand, it’s got to be cohesive. So as you continue to create your beautiful masterpieces and fill up your Mtvibes media portfolio, remember who you are, remember your elevator pitch, and remember your target audience. The more pieces you have that reinforce your brand, the more opportunities you’ll have to cement yourself into a potential fan’s noggin. Some famous ad-man once said that a brand is the most valuable piece of real estate in the world: it’s a corner of someone’s mind. So get in there and claim that land in the name of Nigeria. Or where ever.

  1. Judge your book by its cover.

How you present your work matters. Whether you’re in music, photography or film you’ll need a portfolio Mtvibes media is a pretty amazing resource for this. They’ve got it all laid out for you already, so you won’t have to worry too much about the structure of it. Of course, it wouldn’t hurt to also link to your Mtvibes media portfolio on our website that’s branded in your style. Some useful tools for branding your self is available with us. We made sure our site is mobile-optimized!

You should also think about a logo for yourself, if you haven’t already. If you’re a graphic designer, you might already know something about branding identity, but if not consider inviting our visual artist to help you develop your brand image.

Once you’ve got your look, put it everywhere – on our site, you pages on social media, on business cards, on stickers, on your notebook, your purse, your forehead. You’ll see why in step 6…

  1. Sell yourself.

Starting out as an artist requires a small amount of aggressive prostitution. This means going to shows – whether it’s fashion, art, music, whatever – and bringing those business cards. This also means learning your industry inside-out. Are there people you absolutely idolize and would like to be one day? Find them on Twitter. Follow. Comment. Retweet.

If you never try, you’ll never find those few gems out there who will absolutely be your guardian angels.

Get in touch with agents, get in touch with people who tried to start in your field and failed, get in touch with artists in your genre that are just starting to make it big, get in touch with gallery owners and see if they’re doing a show for up-and-coming artists soon… get in touch. Get your name out there. Ask for help. Ask for reviews. Ask for constructive criticism. (And sit tight through the destructive criticism.)

This is not easy. It’s pretty hard, actually. But if you never try, you’ll never find those few gems out there who will absolutely be your guardian angels and help you through.

  1. Never say no.

All of this selling yourself is bound to get you some offers of work. And some of that is bound to be kind of strange. But when you’re first starting out, well, beggars can’t be choosers. As an old advertising teacher once told me: “Never turn down a brief.” All work won’t necessarily be good work, but all work is work. And you can always learn from work.

  1. Be Flexible.

Building your brand is all well and good, but it won’t do you any favors if it gets you stuck in a rut. A simple revision or update every now and again won’t destroy your hard-won brain real estate forever – and besides, if you’ve done step 1 well, you won’t need sudden, massive alterations.

But people do change. You and your work will change. You’ll learn what your audience really loves and what they could live without. You’ll discover new sources of inspiration for whole new bodies of work. And that’s great! Just don’t forget to bring your brand along for the ride.

LET US HELP YOU BUILD YOUR BRAND TODAY. CLICK here TO CONTACT US

WIN-WIN

0

IT’S A WIN-WIN.

Sponsoring an MTvibes media academy event provides you the unique opportunity to connect with the MTvibes media Academy community, to build brand awareness and show your company’s support of an important cause: the arts!

Each event reaches a different key audience segment and provides a fun, entertaining and engaging way for you to “wow” clients, vendors and employees. Feel good about supporting our local arts, movies, shows, heritage and cultural organizations as you enjoy an unforgettable evening.

WE’LL FIND THE RIGHT FIT.

Looking for the opportunity to become a part of one of the biggest events of the year? To put your company name in front of hundreds of sophisticated party goers? Want to show your employees and investors your dedication to our community? Consider a sponsorship at

mtvibes media

DESTINATION PREMIERE PRODUCTION.

More in the mood for an intimate networking opportunity? Looking for a one-of-a-kind experience to make a big impression? Learn more about sponsoring

Bethelez

MY OVERDOSE; A GOSPEL MUSICAL ALBUM VIDEO BY BETHELEZ.

If you want to be part of a fun, funky, festive evening, RULE YOUR DESTINY SHOW, sponsorship is right for you. Get your name in front of local young professionals, reward your employees and show your clients how cool you really are. Associate your name with art, support our local artists and receive long-term recognition when you sponsor an exhibit at the

100 KARAOKE COMPETITIONS DURING SERIES LIVE EVERY SUNDAY AT EVERY POPULAR SIDE OF OUR EVENTS.

14,329FansLike
948FollowersFollow
65,854FollowersFollow
9,212SubscribersSubscribe

Latest posts